Examining the NGO Security Discourse on Urban Warfare

Abstract

NGOs (non-governmental organizations) or CSOs (civil society organizations) have become important actors in international human rights frameworks, in general, and with respect to armed conflicts in particular. NGOs, both individually and through wider transnational advocacy networks and global civil society frameworks, make pronouncements, publish reports, and submit evidence regarding allegations of human rights and international law violations in a wide range of venues. They are also influential in setting the agendas of United Nations bodies, legal structures such as the International Criminal Court (ICC), and other frameworks that consider issues related to the Law of Armed Conflict (LOAC) and International Humanitarian Law (IHL).

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About the Authors

Anne Herzberg

Anne Herzberg

Anne Herzberg is the Legal Advisor of NGO Monitor. She is a graduate of Oberlin College and Columbia University Law School. Prior to joining NGO Monitor, she worked as an attorney in New York. Her areas of research include business and human rights, international human rights law, the laws of armed conflict, universal jurisdiction, international fact finding, NGOs, and the UN.

Josh Bacon